Employees are being told over and over again how they need to take responsibility for developing their own careers, and there is information being provided to them from all over to help them understand what they need to drive their careers forward. While no one is in any doubt that individuals must take charge, what is perhaps less clear is the role of the manager in developing their employees’ careers.

Great management is about taking a genuine interest in your team’s development, skills and contributions and facilitating the career progression that the individual is driving. It is often what attracts an employee to an organisation, what helps them deliver their best performance for that organisation and, arguably, what encourages them to stay with that organisation.

With this in mind, here are some tips on how to keep track of and enhance your employees’ potential:

1. Track your team’s performance
Do you really understand the respective strengths and weaknesses of those in your team? Spend some time recording and analysing your employees’ skills and areas of weakness to find where they could benefit from additional training and development.

2. Plan opportunities for development
With this information to hand you can begin implementing on-the-job-training by incorporating your team’s development needs when setting their work schedule. Ask employees to identify the areas where they feel they could benefit from more experience.

3. Schedule regular progress updates
Limiting feedback to an annual or quarterly appraisal alone just won’t cut it. Make time to have regular one-on-one chats with your employees to let them know how they’re progressing in their role and to take stock of any challenges they may be encountering.

4. Facilitate opportunities for progression within the firm
As a manager it’s your job to share talent across the firm. Make your employees aware of opportunities available in other departments where their talents could be appreciated, developed and their careers could be taken to the next level and let the rest of the organisation know of any star performers or potential transfers.

Simple techniques such are these should be easy to implement while adding relatively little to your existing workload. With the chance to gain recognition as an effective leader and mentor, adopting an altruistic approach to your employee’s development needs can produce positive results for all.

Helping your team develop How to help your team develop their careers 14 Aug 2014 management, communication, motivation, Reference: Tlnt; The Muse; HBR; Forbes

Employees are being told over and over again how they need to take responsibility for developing their own careers, and there is information being provided to them from all over to help them understand what they need to drive their careers forward. While no one is in any doubt that individuals must take charge, what is perhaps less clear is the role of the manager in developing their employees’ careers. Great management is about taking a genuine interest in your team’s development, skills and contributions and facilitating the career progression that the individual is driving. It is often what attracts an employee to an organisation, what helps them deliver their best performance for that organisation and, arguably, what encourages them to stay with that organisation. With this in mind, here are some tips on how to keep track of and enhance your employees’ potential:

Track your team’s performance Do you really understand the respective strengths and weaknesses of those in your team? Spend some time recording and analysing your employees’ skills and areas of weakness to find where they could benefit from additional training and development.

Plan opportunities for development With this information to hand you can begin implementing on-the-job-training by incorporating your team’s development needs when setting their work schedule. Ask employees to identify the areas where they feel they could benefit from more experience.

Schedule regular progress updates Limiting feedback to an annual or quarterly appraisal alone just won’t cut it. Make time to have regular one-on-one chats with your employees to let them know how they’re progressing in their role and to take stock of any challenges they may be encountering.

Facilitate opportunities for progression within the firm As a manager it’s your job to share talent across the firm. Make your employees aware of opportunities available in other departments where their talents could be appreciated, developed and their careers could be taken to the next level and let the rest of the organisation know of any star performers or potential transfers. Simple techniques such are these should be easy to implement while adding relatively little to your existing workload. With the chance to gain recognition as an effective leader and mentor.

 

Are you an emotionally intelligent boss?
July 14 abintegro

Research is increasingly showing emotional intelligence to be an integral part of good leadership with more than 90% of managers displaying a high level of EQ, according to a recent study.

Emotional intelligence might have a nice ring to it, but what does it actually mean in real terms? In a leadership context, it means being secure enough in your own abilities to put your own career to one side to tune into the people you are managing, not just their work performance, but also their feelings, interests and problems.

Being conscious of how your words and actions affect those around you is also important, while it might also mean being available for employees to come to you with any difficulties they are facing in or outside of work.

Do you have the emotional awareness to manage people successfully? Find out now by taking this fun, one-minute EQ quiz.

1. Your assistant arrives into work teary eyed. Do you:
A) ignore it, she’s probably just having relationship issues again;
B) ask her if she would like to take some time out to attend to whatever is troubling her;
C) remind her you’ve a busy day ahead and you need her to be at the top of her game.

2. You get a last minute piece of work through from a client do you:
A) give it to your best guys so you can go home. They’ll appreciate the extra responsibility;
B) stay late and stick on the task until it’s done. That’s why you earn the big bucks;
C) keep the whole office back for an all-nighter. The customer comes first, after all.

3. A colleague cheekily suggests you’re putting your feet up now you’ve risen to management level. Do you:
A) chastise them for a lack of respect;
B) accept the joke in the manner it was intended and have a dig at them back;
C) make a quick dash back to your office, they’re onto you

4. One of the graduates in your office invites you out for birthday drinks after work. Do you:
A) decline the invitation. Someone else’s birthday drinks is nothing to do with you.
B) go for one drink but leave soon after so as not to make anyone feel uncomfortable;
C) go along and show these youngsters how it’s done

5. Two of your employees have fallen out and can no longer work together. Do you:
A) ask HR to resolve the issue, it’s what they’re there for;
B) sit them down individually and try and work out a solution;
C) arrange for the least valuable of the two to be transferred. You can’t afford any distractions in the work place?

You answered…

Mostly A
You may think that being somewhat aloof is the best way to manage your employees, but you’re taking it a bit too far with your ostrich tendencies. Whether it’s a conscious choice or just a preference to avoid doing the ‘people thing’, try engaging a bit more, handling conflicts more yourself and really trying to empathise more with others to gauge their moods and feelings. You’ll end up with a more cohesive, successful team who will try their very hardest for you.

Mostly B
Well done! You display a high degree of emotional intelligence. You are empathetic, caring towards your employees, can laugh at yourself and are not afraid of conflict.

Mostly C
You seem to be more interested in exerting your influence, progressing your own career and driving your own agenda than listening to others or being aware of the impact your words and actions have on them. You share some worrying similarities with David Brent when it comes to people skills. Try engaging on a more altruistic basis, and remember the people you trample on now could come back to haunt you later on in your career.

 

Another international football tournament, another premature English exit. According to former Italy international Gianluca Vialli, the Three Lions’ latest humiliation comes down to the inability of English players to cope with pressure. The Italians, on the other hand, apparently “eat pressure for breakfast”.

In the interview with the BBC he said that pressure was made up of three things: expectation, scrutiny and consequence. It’s an interesting concept that is highly applicable to the workplace. For teams that struggle to deal with pressure at work managers can do much to help.

With that in mind, here are some useful techniques and advice on ways you can help your team perform when the heat is on.

1. Be consistent

England as a nation and a team often have two years of mild depression accompanied by no expectation and no support and then suddenly one month before a big tournament there is a massive expectation to win. The contrast is unbalancing. As a manager it’s important that you manage your team’s understanding of the expectations upon them in a consistent manner. Make sure they really understand the regular standard of performance you expect.

2. Set realistic expectations

Likewise, while setting high standards can sometimes be a great motivator, providing a clear understanding of a project’s chances of success and failure will help to relieve pressure and prevent unnecessary allocation of time and resources.

3. Watch your levels of scrutiny

England experience extraordinary levels of scrutiny with little support. Much of which can only have a negative impact on their performance. Once your project at work is in motion, a key aspect of effective management is to be available to lend the right level of support. This means finding the right blend of involvement and delegation and providing feedback without overly scrutinising or criticising your team’s efforts.

4. Be clear about the consequences

Pressure and the stress that accompanies it are often the result of overestimating (or just as easily underestimating) the consequences that come with success or failure. It is a manager’s job to mitigate this and ensure the worst and best case scenarios are clearly outlined from the start.

Doing the above might not turn your team into world beaters overnight (you can only do so much with the resources available after all), however, helping your team to navigate potential pressure hot spots should help to get the best out them and boost your own chances of success.

The good side of performance appraisals.

The good side of performance appraisals.

 

The good side of performance appraisals

May 2014
in employment
Reference: Performance Appraisal; about.com; what is human resource
 
 
Performance appraisals have a rather uncomfortable association with judgement. The performance of the employee is, after all, being appraised – similes for which are valued, judged, assessed or evaluated. As such employees tend to feel defensive and stressed at the prospect of an appraisal.

The evaluation element of the appraisal is important to the organisation. It allows them to check that the employee has understood the requirements of the role, is aware of objectives and is achieving them; it enables comparison with the progress of other employees and it gives them information on the effectiveness of their recruiting process – how are recruits we brought on two years ago doing now? A performance appraisal enables them to understand the balance of talent across the organisation, determine organisational training needs and is often the only way that organisations can determine who gets the promotions and the rewards.

However, performance appraisals have other clear benefits to the employee and ultimately the manager and the organisation that are not about comparison or evaluation against a scale. 

Recognition
This is your chance to be formally recognised for your achievements. So filling in that form correctly and being very clear about what you have done is vital. That recognition is not just a box-ticking exercise it is what gives you the motivation to achieve more. It will make you feel more valued, part of the team, more committed to your role and the organisation and your job satisfaction will increase.

Development
This is not about your being labelled as someone that ‘requires development’, but about putting forward the case that you’d like the opportunity to train in a specific area. Discussing your career aspirations with your manager could also highlight areas that you need to develop to achieve your longer term goals. The performance appraisal is your chance to develop and progress. 

One-on-one time
Getting your supervisor’s undivided attention for this amount of time is likely to be a rare occurrence so this is your opportunity to talk about issues that might not otherwise be addressed. It is a chance to discover what you need to work on to make sure you continue to get better and better. Think carefully about what you need to talk about and don’t waste your time together.

So the next time you are facing an appraisal remember that this is not simply about a judgement of your efforts; it is also a mechanism to allow you to improve your job satisfaction, motivation, progress and overall well-being at work. For more information on Appraisal systems or coaching for performance contact Claire or Margaret on 07771 332204.

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