Are you an emotionally intelligent boss?
July 14 abintegro

Research is increasingly showing emotional intelligence to be an integral part of good leadership with more than 90% of managers displaying a high level of EQ, according to a recent study.

Emotional intelligence might have a nice ring to it, but what does it actually mean in real terms? In a leadership context, it means being secure enough in your own abilities to put your own career to one side to tune into the people you are managing, not just their work performance, but also their feelings, interests and problems.

Being conscious of how your words and actions affect those around you is also important, while it might also mean being available for employees to come to you with any difficulties they are facing in or outside of work.

Do you have the emotional awareness to manage people successfully? Find out now by taking this fun, one-minute EQ quiz.

1. Your assistant arrives into work teary eyed. Do you:
A) ignore it, she’s probably just having relationship issues again;
B) ask her if she would like to take some time out to attend to whatever is troubling her;
C) remind her you’ve a busy day ahead and you need her to be at the top of her game.

2. You get a last minute piece of work through from a client do you:
A) give it to your best guys so you can go home. They’ll appreciate the extra responsibility;
B) stay late and stick on the task until it’s done. That’s why you earn the big bucks;
C) keep the whole office back for an all-nighter. The customer comes first, after all.

3. A colleague cheekily suggests you’re putting your feet up now you’ve risen to management level. Do you:
A) chastise them for a lack of respect;
B) accept the joke in the manner it was intended and have a dig at them back;
C) make a quick dash back to your office, they’re onto you

4. One of the graduates in your office invites you out for birthday drinks after work. Do you:
A) decline the invitation. Someone else’s birthday drinks is nothing to do with you.
B) go for one drink but leave soon after so as not to make anyone feel uncomfortable;
C) go along and show these youngsters how it’s done

5. Two of your employees have fallen out and can no longer work together. Do you:
A) ask HR to resolve the issue, it’s what they’re there for;
B) sit them down individually and try and work out a solution;
C) arrange for the least valuable of the two to be transferred. You can’t afford any distractions in the work place?

You answered…

Mostly A
You may think that being somewhat aloof is the best way to manage your employees, but you’re taking it a bit too far with your ostrich tendencies. Whether it’s a conscious choice or just a preference to avoid doing the ‘people thing’, try engaging a bit more, handling conflicts more yourself and really trying to empathise more with others to gauge their moods and feelings. You’ll end up with a more cohesive, successful team who will try their very hardest for you.

Mostly B
Well done! You display a high degree of emotional intelligence. You are empathetic, caring towards your employees, can laugh at yourself and are not afraid of conflict.

Mostly C
You seem to be more interested in exerting your influence, progressing your own career and driving your own agenda than listening to others or being aware of the impact your words and actions have on them. You share some worrying similarities with David Brent when it comes to people skills. Try engaging on a more altruistic basis, and remember the people you trample on now could come back to haunt you later on in your career.

Advertisements